5 Tips to a Healthy Mental Wellness Practice

The phrase “mental wellness” is becoming more and more common as we enter into this new year. Mental health in general is now widely accepted and for good reason. 

Alison Seponara, a licensed professional counselor and author of the book “The Anxiety Healer’s Guide” says that mental health helps determine how you handle stress, relate to others, and make choices. This month, we’d like to encourage you to embrace a healthy mental wellness practice.

Nurturing our mental wellness can help with self-esteem, improved mood, reducing anxiety, clearer thinking and managing stress which ultimately leads to overall better health. Let’s dive into 5 ways we can develop and maintain mental wellness.

1. Sleep

Improve your memory, reduce stress and stay alert with good sleeping habits. Did you know that the CDC reported, people who averaged 6 hours of sleep or less per night were about 2.5 times more likely to report frequent mental distress than those who averaged more than 6 hours of sleep? 

  • Start by creating a quiet, cool, relaxing environment for sleep. 
  • Try to keep the same sleep pattern of when you go to sleep and when you wake up.
  • Put the caffeine down in the mid to late afternoon.

2. Physical Health

Keeping your body active by getting outside for a nature walk, starting a new exercise routine or simply stretching daily can help reduce stress, anxiety and depression. This increases blood flow which helps get more oxygen through your body.

Another way to improve your physical health is through the foods you eat. Incorporating foods into your diet that are packed with mood-boosting nutrients like berries, omega-3 fatty acids (fish) and whole grains will naturally increase your defense against stress.

3. Nurture Relationships

Cultivating positive connections and nurturing our existing friendships can have a great impact on our mental health. Psychology Today says that when we show love and compassion to other people, it releases chemicals in the pre-frontal cortex and reward center of the brain that professionals refer to as the “Helper’s High.” People who help others report many positive mental and physical health benefits, including lower levels of stress, lower blood pressure, and relief from depression and physical pain.

4. Mindfulness 

Jennice Vilhauer, Ph.D., Director of Emory University’s Adult Outpatient Psychotherapy Program in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science in the School of Medicine says that mindfulness allows you to have conscious awareness of what you are doing, so you can make choices to override automatic thinking and make positive changes in thoughts and behavior. 

When you are mindful, you are able to observe events in a non-judgmental way, which allows you to detach from negative emotions, as opposed to being controlled by them. As a result, the way you respond to events in your life starts to change. Your emotions are better regulated, and you stop getting so upset, angry, or fearful over things you can’t control. You are also not flooding your brain with fear and worry about the future or resentments from the past, which has the profoundly positive effect of resetting your emotional state to calm and peaceful.

5. Stimulate The Brain

Learning a new skill or hobby this year can keep the brain healthy and active. These activities involve a combination of memory, decision-making and strategizing, which keeps the brain active and prevents dementia.

Know When Its Time to Reach Out

Southend Psychiatry is here as you navigate this new year. We can come alongside you to offer support and help. Contact Southend Psych today to inquire about appointment availability and get on your way to a better you.

Southend Psychiatry 

Schedule your appointment today with one of our SouthEnd Psychiatry clinicians. Book your appointment online or call 1-800-632-7969 to get started today.

Grief and the Holidays: 5 Practical Tips to Help Cope

Grief is complicated. It is ever-changing and unique for each person going through it. Coping can sometimes feel overwhelming… especially during the holiday season when certain songs are played or when special festive decorations bring back memories with that loved one. 

You are not alone.

Our hearts can feel conflicted between the joy of the season and the painful feelings of our own loss. Family gatherings, holiday traditions, and memories of years past all seem to contribute to these distressing emotions.

There is hope.

Although totally removing our feelings of loss is not possible; there are ways we can help reduce some of that internal conflict and even make our experiences enjoyable.

1. Plan Ahead

Psychology Today offers this guidance: “Often, the anticipation over how hard something is going to be is worse than the actual event. So while that holiday dinner may only last two hours, you could easily spend three weeks dreading it. Create a simple plan for how you’ll get through the holidays to avoid extending your anguish. Drive yourself to holiday functions or ride with a trusted friend who will take you home whenever you want. Just knowing you can easily leave at any time can help you enjoy the activity much more than you would if you felt stuck.”

Certain holiday roles may need to be filled when those have been vacated by loss. Planning ahead can help avoid unexpected sorrow. Consider who might fill those empty spaces before the moment arises.

2. Honor Traditions and Memories

A helpful way to keep your loved one’s memory present is to continue practicing holiday traditions. You can also find ways to honor those who are no longer here by dedicating time to remember and celebrate them. Grief.com gives us these examples:

  • A prayer before the Holiday dinner, about your loved one.
  • Light a candle for your loved one.
  • Create an online tribute for them.
  • Share a favorite story about your loved one.
  • Have everyone tell a funny story about your loved one.

3. Allow Yourself to Feel

We all grieve in our own unique way. There is no right or wrong way. You may even experience different emotions from year to year. That’s okay. Laugh and embrace joy when it comes. Grieve and mourn when those feelings arise. It is important to acknowledge all of our feelings and to not avoid them. 

Developing healthy coping skills can help walk us through these moments:

  • Go for a walk 
  • Start or continue journaling
  • Deep breathing
  • Practice yoga/meditation
  • Speak positive affirmations to yourself

4. Volunteer

Doing something to help another can lift a grieving spirit. We can draw comfort from doing good to others. Even in the midst of our grief, we have so much to offer to those in need:

  • Donate to a family in need. 
  • Volunteer at a shelter or soup kitchen. 
  • Invite a guest to holiday dinner that might otherwise spend it alone.
  • Support another who is also grieving a loss.

5. Ask for Help

Surround yourself with friends, family, and coworkers who love and support you. Reminding loved ones that this time is difficult and sharing your holiday plans with them can help. It can also be extremely valuable to reach out for professional talk therapy. If you are struggling with grief and the complicated feelings that arise during the holidays, don’t be afraid to seek professional help.

Southend Psychiatry is here as you navigate the pressures, demands and triggers of the holidays. We can come alongside you to offer support and help. Contact Southend Psych today to inquire about appointment availability and get on your way to a better you.

Southend Psychiatry 

Schedule your appointment today with one of our SouthEnd Psychiatry clinicians. Book your appointment online or call 1-800-632-7969 to get started today.

 

Family, Stress & the Holidays

When you think of the upcoming holiday season, does it immediately raise anxiety and stress levels? If so, you are not alone. This season can sometimes bring unexpected gatherings with toxic family members, an overcommitment of gift-giving, streets full of impatient drivers, and the stress of managing it all.  

There is hope. Believe it or not, we can all still have a joyous holiday despite the stressors that come with this season. Here are some practical tips to help make this holiday one you can genuinely enjoy.

Boundaries. Boundaries. Boundaries.

Boundary issues can be the most difficult to handle at the family level. It can feel uncomfortable if we haven’t practiced this skill. Start with these 4 rules:

  • Set your boundaries. What will you tolerate and not tolerate? What behaviors will you accept and not accept? Include everything from protecting your schedule to how someone can treat you. Write them down and trust your decisions. 
  • Decide the consequences. Most of us have at least one “boundary breaker” in our family therefore decide ahead of time what the consequences will be if your boundary is broken…regardless of who breaks it.
  • Communicate clearly. Make your boundaries and consequences known…especially with family members who are known to cross the line. Be direct and clear. Their response or reaction is not your responsibility.  
  • Follow through. If a boundary is broken, you know what to do. Be firm yet compassionate. Honor yourself by not allowing people to treat you poorly.

Set Realistic Expectations.

For some reason, we can feel like the holidays have to be perfect or even better than last year. We try to top last year’s gift list or attend more parties. FOMO (fear of missing out) is a real struggle for many however it comes at a cost. Consider these ideas:

  • Stick to a budget. Decide ahead of time how much you can afford and stick to it. If you are someone who loves showering people with gifts, think of ways to do this without overspending.
  • Plan ahead. Choose specific days for shopping, baking and family gatherings. Avoid last minute trips to the store by planning your menus and shopping lists in advance. 
  • Take time for yourself. This season is meant to be enjoyed by all…including you. Even setting aside 15 minutes a day alone to take a walk, read, or meditate can drastically reduce stress.

Know When to Seek Professional Help.

Talk therapy is always a good idea…especially when it is with a licensed therapist. If you are feeling persistently anxious, unable to sleep at night or focus during the day, let’s talk. 

Southend Psychiatry is here as you navigate the pressures, demands and triggers of the holidays. We can come alongside you to offer support and help. Contact Southend Psych today to inquire about appointment availability and get on your way to a better you.

Southend Psychiatry 

Schedule your appointment today with one of our SouthEnd Psychiatry clinicians. Book your appointment online or call 1-800-632-7969 to get started today.

Fighting Depression Together

In the US alone, about 1 in 10 people experience depression. From the pandemic to social unrest, there are many factors in today’s society that contribute to this rising mental health condition.

Psychology Today states:

“The trigger for depression can be almost any negative experience or hardship. Triggers can be external—losing a parent (especially when young), losing a job or developing a debilitating disease—or they can be internal and invisible, such a brooding over that most common of experiences, a failed relationship. People differ in their susceptibility, both by virtue of the biological heritage, their parenting heritage, their styles of thinking, the coping skills they acquire or deliberately cultivate, and the degree to which situations afford them the ability to control their fate.”

What is Depression?

Webster defines depression as a mood disorder that is marked by varying degrees of sadness, despair, and loneliness and that is typically accompanied by inactivity, guilt, loss of concentration, social withdrawal, sleep disturbances, and sometimes suicidal tendencies.

Signs of Depression

According to the latest edition of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, depression can be considered an illness when at least five symptoms occur together for at least two weeks. Symptoms include:

  • Feelings of sadness, emptiness, or hopelessness
  • Irritability, angry outbursts, or low frustration tolerance
  • Loss of interest in or ability to enjoy usual activities, from sex to sports
  • Sleep disturbance, whether inability to sleep (insomnia) or sleeping too much (hypersomnia)
  • Fatigue and lack of energy; everything feels effortful
  • Appetite disturbance, including loss of interest in eating and weight loss or overeating and weight gain
  • Anxiety, agitation, and restlessness
  • Slowed thinking, moving, or talking
  • Feelings of worthlessness and guilt, a focus on past failure, self-blame
  • Difficulty concentrating, remembering things, and making decisions
  • Recurring thoughts of death
  • Physical pain such as headaches or back pain that has no clear cause.

How Can Therapy Help?

At SouthEnd Psychiatry, our therapy team first helps patients understand what thoughts, feelings and beliefs are contributing to their depression. We then begin to develop healthy coping skills to combat and prevent depressive episodes. 

Negative thought patterns directly affect our mood. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) helps us understand these patterns. We learn how to reframe our thoughts through newly developed skills including meditation.

How Can We Help a Loved One With Depression?

Helping someone with depression can come in many forms. Acknowledgment, understanding and empathy are a great place to start! Here are five ways you can help a loved one battling depression:

  • Encourage therapy treatment. Depression is a complex disorder. Talking to someone who is trained and experienced can mean all the difference in the world. SouthEnd Psychiatry has many different therapy plans and means of communication to help make seeing a therapist easy.
  • Get active. People battling depression tend to loose motivation yet physical activity is a great form of behavioral activation. Invite your loved one on a walk. Exercise, sunshine and companionship all have antidepressant qualities.
  • Intentional sleeping habits. Our sleep patterns can be negatively affected by depression. Encourage your loved one to be intentional about getting a good night’s sleep through meditation, a healthy night time wind down routine and consistent bed times.
  • Keep talking. Maintaining regular contact with someone battling depression is key. Take time to listen without judgement or criticism. Social contact helps prevent alienation and seclusion.

Southend Psychiatry is here as you navigate the complexities of today. We can come alongside you or your loved one to offer support and help. Contact Southend Psych today to inquire about appointment availability and get on your way to a better you.

Southend Psychiatry 

Schedule your appointment today with one of our SouthEnd Psychiatry clinicians. Book your appointment online or call 1-800-632-7969 to get started today.

Suicide Prevention: Know the Warning Signs

Currently in the US, there is not an effective and accessible central crisis response system that will connect people to the treatment and the support they need. This needs to change and The National Alliance of Mental Health (NAMI) is dedicating September’s Suicide Prevention Awareness Month to advocate for better mental health care including support systems and accessible treatment.

Noticing signs of possible mental illness isn’t always easy since there is not a generic test one would take on their own without a professional. Feelings and thoughts of suicide happen in just about every background, race, age and demographic and is often the result of an untreated mental health condition.

NAMI teaches readers about the warning signs listed below of mental health distress.

Each illness has its own symptoms, but common signs of mental illness in adults and adolescents can include the following: 

  • Excessive worrying or fear 
  • Feeling excessively sad or low 
  • Confused thinking or problems concentrating and learning 
  • Extreme mood changes, including uncontrollable “highs” or feelings of euphoria 
  • Prolonged or strong feelings of irritability or anger 
  • Avoiding friends and social activities 
  • Difficulties understanding or relating to other people 
  • Changes in sleeping habits or feeling tired and low energy 
  • Changes in eating habits such as increased hunger or lack of appetite 
  • Changes in sex drive 
  • Difficulty perceiving reality (delusions or hallucinations, in which a person experiences and senses things that don’t exist in objective reality) 
  • Inability to perceive changes in one’s own feelings, behavior or personality (”lack of insight” or anosognosia) 
  • Overuse of substances like alcohol or drugs 
  • Multiple physical ailments without obvious causes (such as headaches, stomach aches, vague and ongoing “aches and pains”) 
  • Thinking about suicide 
  • Inability to carry out daily activities or handle daily problems and stress 
  • An intense fear of weight gain or concern with appearance 

Mental health conditions can also begin to develop in young children. Because they’re still learning how to identify and talk about thoughts and emotions, children’s most obvious symptoms are behavioral. Symptoms in children may include the following: 

  • Changes in school performance 
  • Excessive worry or anxiety; for instance, fighting to avoid bed or school 
  • Hyperactive behavior 
  • Frequent nightmares 
  • Frequent disobedience or aggression 
  • Frequent temper tantrums 

If you or someone you love is displaying some of the warning signs above, there are proven steps to take when navigating a crisis.

Navigating a Mental Health Crisis (cited from NAMI.org)

  • Talk openly and honestly. Don’t be afraid to ask questions like: “Do you have a plan for how you would kill yourself?” 
  • Remove means such as guns, knives or stockpiled pills 
  • Calmly ask simple and direct questions, like “Can I help you call your psychiatrist?” 
  • If there are multiple people around, have one person speak at a time
  • Express support and concern 
  • Don’t argue, threaten or raise your voice 
  • Don’t debate whether suicide is right or wrong 
  • If you’re nervous, try not to fidget or pace 
  • Be patient 

Southend Psych is here as you navigate the complexities of today. We can come alongside you or your loved one to offer support and help. Contact Southend Psych today to inquire about appointment availability and get on your way to a better you.

Southend Psychiatry 

Schedule your appointment today with one of our SouthEnd Psychiatry clinicians. Book your appointment online or call 1-800-632-7969 to get started today.

Featured Provider: Meet Justina A Momah, DNP-S, PMHNP-BC, CRNP-BC

This month’s featured provider is Justina A Momah is a board-certified family nurse practitioner and is currently enrolled at Wilkes University’s board certified Psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner and Doctoral Nursing degree. She attained a Bachelors of Science in Nursing from the College of New Rochelle. 

Justina Momah, as a nurse practitioner, is well experienced in both chronic and medical and surgical disease management. She has numerous clinical experiences with diagnosis and treatment of psychiatric mental disease including Depression, Anxiety Disorders, and ADHD.

In her 10 years of practice as a nurse practitioner, Justina has developed a mindset of holistic approach to render care to her patients. She believes that mental health care and awareness that is presented in mainstream media should focus on improving access and quality of care to the economically underserved patient population.

Her primary goal during each patient encounter is to develop a trusting therapeutic relationship hence allowing both patient and provider to create a functional treatment and recovery plan.

In her spare time Justina is a personal lifestyle health and wellness fitness coach. She enjoys teaching high intensity cardio and strength fitness exercises as well as restorative yoga and meditation. She enjoys shopping at local organic farms and finds new paleo recipes to cook for her husband and kids.

What podcast or book are you currently reading/listening to?

“Currently, I am actively enjoying: The Mindset Mentor by Rob Dial and Kast Media. Also, I started on my 5th book of the year which is titled: The 7 habits of Highly Effective People by Stephen R. Covey.”

What is currently on your bucket list?

“To complete an online interior design certification with a focus on a modern-country style of design.”

What do you love to do when you aren’t seeing patients: 

“You will definitely find me coaching an online full body strength and HITT workout program.”

Best advice for navigating 2022:  

“Remember that your path is a journey that shapes your destination and only you can guide the pace as to when you arrive. So enjoy every step of the way and build memories that will propel you beyond your imagination.”

Most memorable moment of 2021:

“Making a decision to further my educational goal of becoming a Board Certified Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner and pursuing completion of my Doctorate in Nursing.”

Lesser known facts about you:

“(1) I am fluent in Spanish. (2) I am a Lord of the Rings Super Fan!!!!! (3) My favorite TV show is Friends.”

What would you like to say to potential patients: 

“My goal of patient care is grounded on establishing a healthy therapeutic relationship with my patients which will enable them to become actively involved in their treatment plan. Therefore, allowing both patient and provider to create a functional treatment and recovery plan that is guided by the most relevant and up-to-date clinical modalities.”

Mental Health Services
Your Way,

Learn about Ruby and her journey towards freedom in her relationships and childhood wounds through SouthEnd Psychiatry.

Millennial mental health. From 9/11 to Parkland, politics to pandemics, social media to telemedicine – this generation is set to positively disrupt the world.  We purposely built SouthEnd for a mental health revolution.

Is it Anxiety or Something More?

One positive outcome of the increased awareness surrounding mental health is that people are talking more about anxiety and how to address its impact on our lives. Anxiety and worry are often confused with more panic attacks, and people suffering from anxiety often wonder when anxiety crosses the line to panic. Panic attacks are often more intense and can occur with or without a trigger, while anxiety attacks are a response to a perceived threat.

The following checklist can help you discern if you or someone else is having a panic attack. When several of these conditions exist together, it’s advised to see a medical professional.

–       Irregular racing heartbeat (may simply feel like it)

–       Sweating

–       Sense of impending doom

–       Fear of loss of control or death

–       Trembling or shaking

–       Shortness of breath

–       Tightness in your throat

–       Chills

Southend Psych is here as you navigate the complexities of today. Whether you have moderate to severe anxiety or are experiencing panic attacks and are under the advice of medical professionals, we can come alongside to offer support and help. Contact Southend Psych today to inquire about appointment availability and get on your way to a better understanding of your anxiety.

Southend Psychiatry 

Schedule your appointment today with one of our SouthEnd Psychiatry clinicians. Book your appointment online or call 1-800-632-7969 to get started today.

Wear Your Green Ribbon in July for Minority Mental Health Awareness Month

July is National Minority Mental Health Awareness Month, a designation developed to bring awareness to minority mental health disparities that exist in our communities. We at SouthEnd Psych hope that you increase your own awareness about this important group of Americans and find ways to spread the love, care, and concern that we can provide to those of diverse backgrounds who may face mental health challenges.

With the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, disparities in mental health services for our minority groups were exacerbated. Interventions that help aid in addressing these disparities include the work being done by many groups to achieve behavioral health equity. According to the U.S Health Department, Behavioral Health Equity is the right to access quality health care for all populations regardless of the individual’s race, ethnicity, gender, socioeconomic status, sexual orientation, or geographical location. This includes access to prevention, treatment, and recovery services for mental and substance use disorders.

Mental health resources provide assistance to both younger and older adults. Minority young adults who battle mental health challenges will find resources at Southend Psych to help them with challenges like bullying, abuse, trauma, and substance use. Equitable access to these resources is provided so that minority teens and children can receive the support they need. Parental resources are also provided because parents are often the first line of defense as they work to help their children navigate the complexities of mental health challenges.

Older adults have access to helpful resources as well. The disparities in care that minority older adults face are often multifaceted, and Southend Psych has a wealth of resources ready to share as we come alongside families and caregivers to ensure minority older adults have the mental health care they need.

National Minority Mental Health Awareness Month sheds a light on this population rich with culture, beauty, and history, and as we strengthen our services to ensure that BIPOC persons are cared for, we strengthen us all. Wear a green ribbon to spread awareness about this important month, and call us if someone in your life is in need of mental health services. 

Southend Psychiatry 

Schedule your appointment today with one of our SouthEnd Psychiatry clinicians. Book your appointment online or call 1-800-632-7969 to get started today.

LGBTQ Pride Month – Becoming the Best YOU!

Fittingly, and to no surprise, Southend Psychiatry is shouting out loud and proud for June LGBTQ Pride month! At this practice, we move with the heartbeat of Inclusion and Equality in everything we do and nothing is more core to our beliefs, so times such as this are a joy to celebrate and bring a real and healthy dialogue, at large. 

PRIDE

If any of us look up the definition of the word “pride” no doubt we could come back with any number of meanings and variations. For purposes of this article, we do not mean it to refer to a sense of arrogance or over-inflated self worth. This definition below fits perfectly with what we want to share today:

  • pride – a becoming or dignified sense of what is due to oneself or one’s position or character; self-respect; self-esteem.

You know exactly what Pride Month means to you and everyone has their own connection and enjoys it their own way. One client recalls Pride Month feeling uncomfortable before she was out; she didn’t know what to do with the conflict, the tension inside. But now, it’s a chance to celebrate and be open with issues which are often stigmatized, especially in this current social/political environment. In her own words, “Let’s make it fun! And make everything sparkl-ey! This isn’t a fight for justice or equality here or anything super heavy. It’s lighter, it’s fun.” Maybe you resonate with something in there too. 

CHALLENGES

While great gains have been made in awareness and societal acceptance for the LGBTQ community, it’s no secret there is a current movement in the U.S. attacking LGBTQ rights in legislation, education, and athletics. It is scary and takes a massive toll on the mental and emotional well-being of those being targeted. Or perhaps you’re still deconstructing a big bag of religious issues/trauma from earlier years which still haunt your sense of self. The fact is, the world is a tumultuous and sometimes frightening place, and for this reason we want to promote with all our Southend heart and soul – SELF CARE!! 

SELF-CARE

To get right to the point we simply want you to take care of your body and your mind in whatever beautiful ways are best for you. This is supposed to be intentional on your part but certainly not meant to be a chore. The result will be refreshing and recharging, allowing you to help love yourself all the way! Think about it this way… picture stress as water on a wet dog. That dog needs to shake it out, vigorously, from head to tail, to feel right again. So do we! While actually shaking like a wet dog may not be your thing, we have a few other suggestions to help get you started. 

  • Sleep : can we just say nothing good happens without sleep?! Our bodies level out physiologically during sleep and it’s a huge part of keeping a healthy mind + body.
  • Seek Joy : Light will chase away darkness so find the things which bring joy to your heart. Music. Nature. Old photos. Disney movies…! Give yourself time and space to find joy!
  • Seek Guidance : Don’t do it alone! Community is HUGE for LGBTQ individuals and we encourage you to find support, somewhere. Perhaps its spiritual support, perhaps it’s therapy, perhaps it’s mimosas with friends on Sunday morning. 
  • Creativity : It’s well known in psychology arenas the benefits creative outlets have on mental health. So go get colorful and paint something, get noisy with a new instrument, or build the coffee table you’ve been putting off for six months.
  • And most importantly be the best YOU possible!! Keep a sight on who you truly are, which is a bright, beautiful, shining star of a person and let that expression show itself. 

We are hopeful this article helps you be a balanced, healthy you in some pretty challenging times. And if June Pride month is where you begin your Self Care plan then even better! 

Southend Psychiatry 

Schedule your appointment today with one of our SouthEnd Psychiatry clinicians. Book your appointment online or call 1-800-632-7969 to get started today.

On a side note, there are now data and trends we can see which indicate higher numbers of individuals who came out during the recent lockdowns. Much of this is attributed to simply a huge increase in time we have spent isolated, and thus more time for self-reflection and a chance for many to really have the time and space to identify who they really are. Interestingly but to no surprise, social media was also significant in this trend as the isolation and alone time allowed people to do more exploring on platforms versus the physical world. Of course, the internet has long been the home of LGBTQ exploration but the current trends and impacts are interesting. This article provides some great expert commentary and data – https://mashable.com/article/covid-coming-out-queer-lgbtq-pandemic.

How to Establish Healthy Boundaries

Who wouldn’t like to say that they have perfect relational boundaries?

While perfection might seem pie-in-the-sky, working on boundaries truly does strengthen them. The effort definitely pays off. Many times, the most difficult part of boundary work occurs when the boundary is established. Calmly and directly stating the boundary to your friend, colleague, or family member can seem intimidating; however, this step sets up the boundary to truly have a positive impact on your own mental health.

We all need healthy boundaries in our lives.

A boundary is where one person ends and you begin. If you feel yourself succumbing to agreeing to events you would rather not attend or people-pleasing your way through life, you need to take the first step and set a boundary.

Boundaries are not mean.

They help you grow and care for yourself. Many people and families have dysfunctional ways of relating, and in the beginning it can feel mean or generate guilt to establish firm boundaries. But, boundaries serve to strengthen the individual setting them and allow others to make decisions about their own lives, leading to more contentment and lower anxiety and depression.

An example of a simple boundary might be, “I am unable to attend the event this weekend.” Terri Cole, author of Boundary Boss lists in her “Boundary Boss Bill of Rights” that “you have the right to say no (or yes) to others without feeling guilty.” Taking the first step and deciding for yourself the best use of your time is boundary work that can reap dividends in peace of mind. 

Whether you are dealing with a co-worker who relies on your advice too often or a family member who is disrespectful, boundaries can make an impact on the quality of not only how you feel about your interactions with others and relationships in general, but also help your confidence increase as you begin to set healthy boundaries with those around you. 

Schedule your appointment today with one of our SouthEnd Psychiatry clinicians. Book your appointment online or call 1-800-632-7969 to get started today.